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Part spy novel, part romance, part Henry James, Your Face Tomorrow is a wholly remarkable display of the immense gifts of Javier Marias. With Fever and Spear, Volume One of his unfolding novel Your Face Tomorrow, he returns us to the rarified world of Oxford (the delightful setting of All Souls and Dark Back of Time), while introducing us to territory entirely new--espionage. Our hero, Jaime Deza, separated from his wife in Madrid, is a bit adrift in London until his old friend Sir Peter Wheeler retired Oxford don and semi-retired master spy recruits him for a new career in British Intelligence. Deza possesses a rare gift for seeing behind the masks people wear. He is soon observing interviews conducted by Her Majesty's secret service: variously shady international businessmen one day, would-be coup leaders the next. Seductively, this metaphysical thriller explores past, present, and future in the ever-more-perilous 21st century. This compelling and enigmatic tour de force from one of Europe's greatest writers continues with Volume Two, Dance and Dream."

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How long does it take to decide if a person is hot? Is your lover more likely to get you pregnant than your husband? Can men tell when a woman is fertile? If you’ve ever wondered how scientists measure love—or whether men really prefer blondes over brunettes—this smart, sexy book provides real answers to these and many other questions about our most baffling dating and mating behaviors. Based on the latest research in biology, evolutionary psychology, neuroscience, and cognitive science, Do Gentlemen Really Prefer Blondes? dares to explain the science behind sex—and opens a fascinating window on the intriguing phenomenon of love and attraction. Covering the areas of bodies, brains, and behavior, this eye-opening guide reveals the genetic, hormonal, and psychological secrets behind what makes us tick sexually. For example, do you know why a man’s body chemistry and behavior change when he’s in a committed relationship? And why, when he becomes a daddy, his testosterone level seems to plummet? And did you know… • When a couple first fall in love, their brains are indistinguishable from those of the clinically insane • You can tell a lot about a person’s sexual chemistry just by looking at his or her hands • Your genes influence whose body odors you prefer • Being around breast-feeding women may increase a woman's sex drive Viewed through the lens of science and instinct, your love life might be seen in a completely different way. Do Gentlemen Really Prefer Blondes? provides both an in-depth exploration into our sexual psyches—and fresh advice for men and women who want to discover the secrets of successful relationships.

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For decades now, serial killers have taken center stage in the news and entertainment media. The coverage of real-life murderers such as Ted Bundy and Jeffrey Dahmer has transformed them into ghoulish celebrities. Similarly, the popularity of fictional characters such as Hannibal “The Cannibal” Lecter or Dexter demonstrates just how eager the public is to be frightened by these human predators. But why is this so? Could it be that some of us have a gruesome fascination with serial killers for the same reasons we might morbidly stare at a catastrophic automobile accident? Or it is something more? In Why We Love Serial Killers, criminology professor Dr. Scott Bonn explores our powerful appetite for the macabre, while also providing new and unique insights into the world of the serial killer, including those he has gained from his correspondence with two of the world’s most notorious examples, David Berkowitz (“Son of Sam”) and Dennis Rader (“Bind, Torture, Kill”). In addition, Bonn examines the criminal profiling techniques used by law enforcement professionals to identify and apprehend serial predators, he discusses the various behaviors—such as the charisma of the sociopath— that manifest themselves in serial killers, and he explains how and why these killers often become popular cultural figures. Groundbreaking in its approach, Why We Love Serial Killers is a compelling look at how the media, law enforcement agencies, and public perception itself shapes and feeds the “monsters” in our midst.

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Life is dark for Steph. After swearing never to be her own worst enemy again, she’s forced to battle her demons once more as events in her life push her to the absolute limits of self-preservation. And she needs to do it alone. Pete is back in the place he swore never to return to, all in the name of protecting Steph from the dangers of his past. But are yesterday’s ghosts the only threat they face? When true intentions are laid bare, can Steph find the fight within to pull herself out of the darkness? Can Pete close the last doors on his past, or will he realize what is truly important, too late? Their history may shape the people they are today, but nobody said it had to define their future …

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Pistol may have got the girl, but it doesn’t mean he won’t have to work to keep her… Steph faces one of the biggest challenges of her life; deciding if the man she’s attracted to for all the wrong reasons is worth enough to risk at all. When her heart is involved, how exactly does she decide when to draw the line? Impossible to tell, isn’t it… Pistol can’t stop himself from satisfying his own needs first, at the risk of Steph’s safety. He wants her with him… at all costs. But is he simply blackmailing her to stay? Or has she truly made the decision for herself? Will he ever know… The dark depths of Pistol’s life before Steph surface when his mother arrives to claim what she believes to be hers. Is an insatiable need for each other enough to keep love alive through such troubling times…

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A wealthy young man saves Margaret McClaren's life and falls in love with her. Then she disappears. Will he find her again? Grace Livingston Hill is the beloved author of more than 100 books. Read and enjoyed by millions, her wholesome stories contain adventure, romance, and the heartwarming triumphs of people faced with the problems of life and love.

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London's Slough House is where the washed-up MI5 spies go to while away what's left of their failed careers. The "slow horses," as they’re called, have all disgraced themselves in some way to get relegated here. Maybe they messed up an op badly and can't be trusted anymore. Maybe they got in the way of an ambitious colleague and had the rug yanked out from under them. Maybe they just got too dependent on the bottle—not unusual in this line of work. One thing they all have in common, though, is they all want to be back in the action. And most of them would do anything to get there─even if it means having to collaborate with one another. Now the slow horses have a chance at redemption. An old Cold War-era spy is found dead on a bus outside Oxford, far from his usual haunts. The despicable, irascible Jackson Lamb is convinced Dickie Bow was murdered. As the agents dig into their fallen comrade's circumstances, they uncover a shadowy tangle of ancient Cold War secrets that seem to lead back to a man named Alexander Popov, who is either a Soviet bogeyman or the most dangerous man in the world. How many more people will have to die to keep those secrets buried?

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They had built their lives in this grand old house, its walls encompassing their family and their secrets. Nestled in the sweeping hills they have always known, the house is part of their history, their heritage. But these four walls also hold a secret. When Lord Frampton dies in a skiing accident, a beautiful young woman named Phaedra appears at his funeral—claiming to be the lord’s illegitimate daughter. In his will, Lord Frampton has left the priceless Frampton suite of sapphires to this interloper, confirming her claim and outraging his three adult sons and widow. Eventually, however, Phaedra’s sweet nature thaws the frosty relationships. She becomes the daughter that Antoinette Frampton never had and a wise and compassionate granddaughter to the formidable Dowager Lady Frampton. But an attraction grows between Phaedra and the eldest son, David. It seems an impossible love—blocked by their blood connection and by the fury of one family member who is determined to expose Phaedra as a fraud. Filled with the luscious scenery and enchanting characters her fans adore, Santa Montefiore’s The Woman from Paris confirms the remarkable power of love to heal broken families and tender hearts. This novel was published under the title The Summer House in the UK. ** From Booklist The day of Lord George Frampton’s funeral is filled with more than the usual sense of drama. A gorgeous young woman sits among the mourners, catching the eye of David, the heir apparent, who’s pleased to see that she’s among the guests attending the memorial reception at his family’s estate. Pleased, that is, until his father’s lawyer introduces Phaedra as Lord George’s recently discovered stepdaughter. Staked to an equal inheritance as his three sons, as well as the family sapphires, Phaedra’s presence causes the expected amount of consternation. To George’s widow, she’s tangible proof of her husband’s secret life; to his skeptical daughter-in-law, she’s a gold-digging usurper. But to David, she just might be the love of his life. As Phaedra beguiles each member of her new family with her infectious joie de vivre, she struggles to conceal a secret that threatens to destroy everyone. Themes of remorse, recrimination, and reconciliation imbue Montefiore’s (The Mermaid Garden, 2011) otherwise bright and buoyant romance with a satisfying depth. --Carol Haggas Review “Santa Montefiore really knows these people inside and out. I couldn’t put this book down.” (Julian Fellowes, creator of Downton Abbey) “The joy Montefiore infuses into her work shines throughout . . . a feel good story, full of exuberance and passion and threaded with hope. Score another winner for Santa Montefiore--this is an exceptional find.” (Seattle Post-Intelligencer.com) "This novel captivates from start to finish, the plot driven by dark secret, unspoken emotions and a forbidden attraction. The characters are striking and complex, leading to intense and sometimes humorous family dynamics. In rich prose, Montefiore tells an engrossing story about overcoming grief and betrayal to find hope, love and happiness in the most unexpected places." (Romantic Times) "Montefiore is an able chronicler of family dynamics, making for a skillfully crafted...tale of high society drama." (Publishers Weekly) "Themes of remorse, recrimination, and reconciliation imbue Montefiore’s...bright and buoyant romance with a satisfying depth." (Booklist) “Readers will be reluctant to leave the golden world Montefiore creates. Fans of Rosamunde Pilcher and Adriana Trigiani will enjoy.” (Library Journal) “The book is filled with glamorous characters discreetly hiding their emotions and motivations.” (Kirkus Reviews) “The characters in The Woman from Paris are alive and real . . . beautifully written.” (Affaire de Coeur)

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A “fascinating” , lively, and hilarious examination of the big questions about love and sex from the perspective of the latest brain science. Philosophers, theologians, artists, and boy bands have waxed poetic about the nature of love for centuries. But what does the brain have to say about the way we carry our hearts? In the wake of a divorce, science writer and single mother Kayt Sukel made herself a guinea pig in the labs of some unusual love experts to find out. In each chapter of this edgy romp through the romantic brain, Sukel looks at a different aspect of love above the belt. What in your brain makes you love someone—or simply lust after them? (And is there really a difference?) Why do good girls like bad boys? Is monogamy practical? How thin is that line between love and hate? Do mothers have a stronger bond with their children than their fathers do? How do our childhood experiences affect our emotional control? Fiercely honest and wonderfully funny, Sukel can offer no simple solutions for the curveballs love throws our way. But after reading this gimlet-eyed look at love, sex, and the brain, you’ll never look at romance the same way again.