TUEBL

The Ultimate Ebook Libraryx

Latest Blog Post:

Newest Books

96367

Four nearly identical girls on a desert island. An unexpected new arrival. A gently warped near future where nothing is quite as it seems. Veronika. Caroline. Isobel. Eleanor. One blond, one brunette, one redhead, one with hair black as tar. Four otherwise identical girls who spend their days in sync, tasked to learn. But when May, a very different kind of girl—the lone survivor of a recent shipwreck—suddenly and mysteriously arrives on the island, an unsettling mirror is about to be held up to the life the girls have never before questioned. Sly and unsettling, Gordon Dahlquist’s timeless and evocative storytelling blurs the lines between contemporary and sci-fi with a story that is sure to linger in readers’ minds long after the final page has been turned.

96366

The first in Gerhardsen's Hammarby series of crime novels that take place in the southern parts of Stockholm. The issue of schoolyard bullying among young children and the effect it has on them when people look the other way lends itself to the premise and various scenes of this story, which is based on some of Gerhardsen’s own childhood experiences. In a short space of time, several beastly murders occur in central Sweden. When criminal investigator Conny Sjöbergt and the Hammarby police begin to discover that there’s a link between the murders, Sjöbergt goes completely cold. There is a killer out there whose motives appear to be very personal, and who will not be deterred by anyone. Often compared to the popular Swedish writing team of police procedurals, Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö, and known for thrillers with taut, suspenseful plots and unexpected twist and turns, Gerhardsen’s novels linger in the reader’s mind long after the finish!

96365

For fans of Stephanie Perkins, Sarah Mlynowski, and Maureen Johnson comes a sexy, poignant, funny, and authentic debut novel by Robin Constantine about the journeys of two New Jersey teens as they discover who they really are—and find their way to each other.Wren Caswell is average. Ranked in the middle of her class at Sacred Heart, she's not popular, not a social misfit. Wren is the quiet good girl who's always done what she's supposed to—only now, in her junior year, this passive strategy is backfiring. She wants to change but doesn't know how.Grayson Barrett was the king of St. Gabe's: star of the lacrosse team, at the top of his class, and on the fast track to a brilliant future—until he was expelled for being a "term-paper pimp." Now Gray is in a downward spiral and needs to change but doesn't know how.One fateful night, their paths cross at Wren's family's Arthurian-themed catering hall. What follows is the complicated, awkward, hilarious, and tender tale of two teens shedding their pasts, figuring out who they are—and falling in love.

96364

It's 1815, and Catherine Courtnay lives the life of an independent woman in London, writing opinion pieces for one of the city's leading newspapers. Until the evening Marcus Lytton, Earl of Wrotham accosts her outside a brothel, sure she's his missing wife, Catalina. Catherine may look exactly like his Spanish bride, but as he gets to know her, Marcus sees that Catherine is nothing like the deceitful wench who tricked him into marriage and ruined his life three years before. But Catherine may be able to help him anyway. Marcus believes Catalina is in England. He also believes she intends to remain hidden until he has been killed and she can claim the Wrotham fortune. Marcus wonders what his wretched wife would do if her place was usurped, if an impostor paraded around London as Lady Wrotham. It might just be enough to bring Catalina and her helpers out into the open where he can deal with them. To Marcus's surprise, Catherine agrees to his half-witted scheme. Catherine may not be his Spanish wife, but she has her own reasons to hate the Earl of Wrotham. Indeed, her only reason for agreeing to pose as his wife is to bring the mighty Earl down herself. She more than anyone else knows just how black his heart truly is. And finally, irrevocably she is going to make him pay for destroying her life.A page-turning adventure from the very beginning! Don't start this book near bedtime, or Dangerous to Hold will become dangerous to your sleep. You'll have to stay up half the night to find out what happens! Once again, Elizabeth Thornton has taken the perfect ingredients--tight plotting, strong conflict, and smooth characters, and sewn them into a seamless romp! No one knows how to keep the action building better than Elizabeth Thornton

96363

Fast-paced and full of surprises, Thornton's (Dangerous to Love) latest novel is an exciting story of romance, mystery, and adventure set in England during the Napoleonic Wars. In the prologue, Deborah Weyman and Quentin, the eight-year-old boy in her charge, witness the murder of the boy's father, Gilbert Barrington. Deborah, who does not see the murderer clearly, hears Barrington address his killer as "Lord Kendal" and is horrified to find that she and Kendal have been named as Quentin's guardians. Fearing that Kendal will kill Quentin to silence him, she takes the boy, assumes a false identity and goes into hiding. Kendal, upon learning that Deborah has abducted Quentin, assumes that she had something to do with Barrington's death and with the espionage Barrington had been about to uncover. He sets out to apprehend her and, when he does, she proves to be a worthy opponent. Their battle of wills is skillfully woven into a complex plot that exuberantly carries the reader through abductions, unmaskings, blackmail and murder. Thornton's firm control of her plot, her graceful prose and her witty dialogue make Dangerous to Kiss a pleasure to read.

96361

When London aristocrat Serena Ward disguises herself as an actress for the Jacobite cause, she does not count on attracting the amorous attention of Julian Raynor, owner of a popular gaming club--and die-hard anti-Jacobite. Their first encounter is a study in mistaken identity and sensuality that results in Serena's downfall. Julian, who blames Serena's father for his family's misfortunes, plans to exact revenge by marrying Serena. Tricked into marriage, Serena finds it difficult to maintain her icy reserve toward Julian, and the attraction she feels for him soon turns to love. In the age-old tradition of love never running smoothly, behind the scenes machinations and treachery ensure that the lovers have much to conquer before they can attain happiness. Thornton, author of six previous historicals, delivers unique plot twists and sharply drawn characters. She uses enforced separation, a genre taboo, to her advantage as she develops conflict. Her knowledge of the Georgian era is evident and lends period flavor to this satisfying read.

96360

In Green Gone Wrong environmental writer Heather Rogers blasts through the marketing buzz of big corporations and asks a simple question: Do today’s much-touted "green" products—carbon offsets, organic food, biofuels, and eco-friendly cars and homes—really work? Implicit in efforts to go green is the promise that global warming can be stopped by swapping out dirty goods for "clean" ones. But can earth-friendly products really save the planet? This far-reaching, riveting narrative explores how the most readily available solutions to environmental crisis may be disastrously off the mark. Rogers travels the world tracking how the conversion from a "petro" to a "green" society affects the most fundamental aspects of life—food, shelter, and transportation. Reporting from some of the most remote places on earth, Rogers uncovers shocking results that include massive clear-cutting, destruction of native ecosystems, and grinding poverty. Relying simply on market forces, people with good intentions wanting to just "do something" to help the planet are left feeling confused and powerless. Green Gone Wrong reveals a fuller story, taking the reader into forests, fields, factories, and boardrooms around the world to draw out the unintended consequences, inherent obstacles, and successes of eco-friendly consumption. What do the labels "USDA Certified Organic" and "Fair Trade" really mean on a vast South American export-driven organic farm? A superlow-energy "eco-village" in Germany’s Black Forest demonstrates that green homes dramatically shrink energy use, so why aren’t we using this technology in America? The decisions made in Detroit’s executive suites have kept Americans driving gas-guzzling automobiles for decades, even as U.S. automakers have European models that clock twice the mpg. Why won’t they sell these cars domestically? And what does carbon offsetting really mean when projects can so easily fail? In one case thousands of trees planted in drought-plagued Southern India withered and died, releasing any CO2 they were meant to neutralize. Expertly reported, this gripping exposé pieces together a global picture of what’s happening in the name of today’s environmentalism. Green Gone Wrong speaks to anyone interested in climate change and the future of the natural world, as well as those who want to act but are caught not knowing who, or what, to believe to protect the planet. Rogers casts a sober eye on what’s working and what’s not, fearlessly pushing ahead the debate over how to protect the planet.

96359

Writing in the fourth century B.C., in an Athens that had suffered a humiliating defeat in the Peloponnesian War, Plato formulated questions that have haunted the moral, religious, and political imagination of the West for more than 2,000 years: what is virtue? How should we love? What constitutes a good society? Is there a soul that outlasts the body and a truth that transcends appearance? What do we know and how do we know it? Plato's inquiries were all the more resonant because he couched them in the form of dramatic and often highly comic dialogues, whose principal personage was the ironic, teasing, and relentlessly searching philosopher Socrates. In this splendid collection, Scott Buchanan brings together the most important of Plato's dialogues, including Protagoras, The Symposium, with its barbed conjectures about the relation between love and madness, Phaedo and The Republic, his monumental work of political philosophy. Buchanan's learned and engaging introduction allows us to see Plato both as a commentator on his society and as a shaper of the societies that followed, who bequeathed to us a hunger for the ideal as well as a redeeming habit of humane skepticism.

The Third Son

Written By: Wu, Julie

96358

It’s 1943. As air-raid sirens blare in Japanese-occupied Taiwan, eight-year-old Saburo walks through the peach forests of Taoyuan. The least favored son of a Taiwanese politician, Saburo is in no hurry to get home to the taunting and abuse he suffers at the hands of his parents and older brother. In the forest he meets Yoshiko, whose descriptions of her loving family are to Saburo like a glimpse of paradise. Meeting her is a moment he will remember forever, and for years he will try to find her again. When he finally does, she is by the side of his oldest brother and greatest rival. Set in a tumultuous and violent period of Taiwanese history— as the Chinese Nationalist Army lays claim to the island and one autocracy replaces another—The Third Son tells the story of lives governed by the inheritance of family and the legacy of culture, and of a young man determined to free himself from both. In Saburo, author Julie Wu has created an extraordinary character, a gentle soul forced to fight for everything he’s ever wanted: food, an education, and his first love, Yoshiko. A sparkling, evocative debut, it will have readers cheering for this young boy with his head in the clouds who, against all odds, finds himself on the frontier of America’s space program

96357

The U.S. House of Representatives—a large, often unruly body of men and women elected every other year from 435 distinct microcosms of America—has achieved renown as “the people’s House,” the world’s most democratic institution, and an acute Rorschach of biennial public passions. In the midterm election year 2010, recession-battered Americans expressed their discontent with a simultaneously overreaching and underperforming government by turning the formerly Democratically controlled House over to the Republicans. Among the new GOP majority were eighty-seven freshmen, many of them political novices with Tea Party backing who pledged a more open, responsive, and fiscally thrifty House. What the 112th Congress instead achieved was a public standing so low—a ghastly 9 percent approval rating— that, as its longest-serving member, John Dingell, would dryly remark, “I think pedophiles would do better.” What happened? Robert Draper explores this question just as he examined the Bush White House in his 2007 New York Times bestselling book Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W. Bush—by burrowing deeply inside the subject, gaining cooperation of the major players, and producing a colorful, unsparingly detailed, but evenhanded narrative of how the House of Representatives became a house of ill repute. Draper’s cast of characters spans the full spectrum of political experience and ideologies—from the Democrat Dingell, a congressman since 1955 (though elbowed out of power by the party’s House leader, Nancy Pelosi), to Allen West, a black Republican Tea Party sensation, former Army lieutenant colonel, and political neophyte with a talent for equal opportunity offending. While unspooling the boisterous, at times tragic, and ultimately infuriating story of the 112th Congress, Draper provides unforgettable portraits of Gabrielle Giffords, the earnest young Arizona congresswoman who was gunned down by a madman at the beginning of the legislative session; Anthony Weiner, the Democrats’ clown prince and self-made media star until the New Yorker self-immolated in a sex scandal; the strong-willed Pelosi and her beleaguered if phlegmatic Republican counterpart, House Speaker John Boehner; the affable majority whip, Kevin McCarthy, tasked with instilling team spirit in the iconoclastic freshmen; and most of all, the previously unknown new members who succeeded in shoving Boehner’s Republican Conference to the far right and thereby bringing the nation, more than once, to the brink of governmental shutdown or economic default. In this lively work of political narrative, Draper synthesizes some of the most talked-about breaking news of the day with the real story of what happened behind the scenes. This book is a timely and masterfully told parable of dysfunction that may well serve as Exhibit A of how Americans lost faith in their democratic institutions. “Congress will rise June 1st, as most of us expect. Rejoice when that event is ascertained. If we should finish and leave the world right side up, it will be happy. Do not ask what good we do: that is not a fair question, in these days of faction.” —Congressman Fisher Ames, May 30, 1796 In Do Not Ask What Good We Do, Robert Draper captures the prophetic sentiment uttered by Fisher Ames over two centuries ago. As he did in writing about President George W. Bush in Dead Certain, Draper provides an insider’s book like no one else can—this time, inside the U.S. House of Representatives. Because of the bitterly divided political atmosphere we live in, because of the combative nature of this Congress, this literary window on the backstage machinations of the House is both captivating and timely—revealing the House in full, from the process of how laws are made (and in this case, not made) to the most eye-popping cast of lawmakers Washington has ever seen.